• Kenya is arguably the world’s flower garden and annually exports tonnes of freshly cut flowers to all corners of the world, more so to Europe.
  • Flower prices have more than doubled during this year’s Valentine’s season due to a shortage of the commodity brought about by heavy rains.
  • While, a bouquet of flowers was selling at Sh700 ($7) last year is now retailing at Sh1,500 ($15).

Kenyan lovebirds planning to buy a bouquet of roses this valentine will have to dig deeper into their pockets.

Flower prices have more than doubled during this year’s Valentine’s season due to a shortage of the commodity brought about by heavy rains that destroyed the flowers late last year.

Kenyan workers sorting out flowers for export
Kenyan workers sorting out flowers for export

Flower firms in the country are grappling with a severe shortage and have registered a 60% drop in production this season. Pests and diseases which emerged following the heavy rains have only added to the woes of flower dealers.

“The industry is grappling with a 60 percent decline in production following heavy rains that impacted negatively on flowers last year,” said Mary Kinyua, the general manager at Oserian Flower farm, Business Daily reported.

A bouquet of flowers was selling at Sh700 ($7) last year is now retailing at Sh1,500 ($15). (nairobicityflorists.)
A bouquet of flowers was selling at Sh700 ($7) last year is now retailing at Sh1,500 ($15). (nairobicityflorists.)

While, a bouquet of flowers was selling at Sh700 ($7) last year is now retailing at Sh1,500 ($15) with buyers still complaining of difficulties in getting the stems from farms.

At City Market in Nairobi, flower vendors have since increased the cost of a stem from Sh20 to Sh50 ($0.5).

Kenyan lovebirds to cough more to buy roses as cost shoot through the roof.
Kenyan lovebirds to cough more to buy roses as cost shoot through the roof.

Kenya is arguably the world’s flower garden and annually exports tonnes of freshly cut flowers to all corners of the world, more so to Europe.

The cut-flower export contributes over 70% of the total fresh produce in annual earnings and remains the largest earner of horticulture.