• The cost of cooking gas has shot up by up to Sh25 per kilogramme in some outlets, fueled by increased global demand. 
  • Pavel Oimeke, Energy and Petroleum Regulatory Authority (EPRA) director-general, says the increase in LPG prices is normal during winter as global demand usually goes up.
  • Coming at a time when many parents are running low on cash after December festivities and with schools opening, the increase in prices is set to hurt household budgets.

Kenyan households are in pain and feeling the heat of rising gas prices.

The cost of cooking gas has shot up by up to Sh25 per kilogramme in some outlets, fueled by increased demand for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) in global markets.

Pavel Oimeke, Energy and Petroleum Regulatory Authority (EPRA) director-general, said the increase in LPG prices was normal during winter as global demand usually goes up.

“It usually happens due to heightened demand and more households use it for heating,” Mr Oimeke said.

A winter weather
A winter weather
AFP

The low temperatures currently experienced in winter in Europe and North America has seen the demand of gas consumption for heating and as result the price of gas.

The Liquefied Petroleum (LPG) Gas regulations that came into force early this year and outlined tough requirements for cooking gas traders has further made cooking gas scarce.

In Nairobi traders were quoting between Sh900 ($9) to Sh1,200 ($12) to refill a 6kg cylinder, representing a rise of between Sh15 to Sh25 per kilogramme.

The cost of the 13kg cylinder varied by near-similar margins depending on the retailer.

No exchange of cooking gas cylinders - EPRA boss Pavel Oimeke announces new law
No exchange of cooking gas cylinders - EPRA boss Pavel Oimeke announces new law

The increase in prices comes against the background of increased consumption of cooking gas locally following the extension of the logging ban and the month-on-month increase in the cost of kerosene, used by poor households for cooking and lighting.

The Energy and Petroleum Regulatory Authority had projected shocks associated with the US-Iran tensions, but had not specified the degree of the effects.

Coming at a time when many parents are running low on cash after December festivities and with schools opening, the increase in prices is set to hurt household budgets.