On Tuesday, August 21, the world joined Muslims across the world in marking and celebrating Eid al-Adha.

  • On Tuesday, August 21, the world joined Muslims across the world in marking and celebrating Eid al-Adha.
  • African leaders were not left behind either in wishing the Muslim electorate in their respective countries a happy and blessed Eid al-Adha.
  • On that note, here is all you need to know about Eid al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr.

African leaders were not left behind either in wishing the Muslim electorate in their respective countries a happy and blessed Eid al-Adha.

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People of other faiths welcome the holiday with open arms, who can say no to a free holiday in midweek.

On that note, here is all you need to know about Eid al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr.

Eid al-Adha

Eid al-Adha is a Muslim celebration which revolves around the time Allah appeared to Ibrahim in a dream and asked him to sacrifice his son, Ishmael, as a sign of his faith.

It’s similar to the Christian and Jewish stories in which God asked Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac, but spared him from doing so.

During this time, Muslims traditionally sacrifice animals, in Britain this is done in a slaughterhouse, and the meat is divided up among friends, family and the needy.

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Eid al-Adha begins on the evening of August 21, 2018, which falls in the middle of the 12th and final month in the Islamic calendar and finishes on Saturday, August 25.

The date of the religious observance changes annually, as it is based around the lunar calendar.

If you have a Muslim friend or you come across one, today is your perfect opportunity to put your Arabic skills to use.

Eid Mubarak is a Muslim greeting reserved for use on the festivals of Eid al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr.

Eid means "celebration", and Mubarak means "blessed".

Eid al-Fitr

Eid al-Fitr on the other hand is another important religious holiday for Muslims.

Eid or Eid al-Fitr marks the end of Ramadan, which is a month of fasting that started on May 16 and finished on June 14 in 2018.

After thirty long days of fasting Eid al-Fitr is a day when Muslims are not permitted to fast.

During Eid, Muslims will often purchase new clothes for the occasion, and take part in festivals and celebrations. Gifts and cards are often exchanged among friends and family.

The celebration is a public holiday in Muslim and some non-Muslim countries.