A new report explains how the massive decline of insects worldwide threaten nature and human existence

Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history — and the rate of species extinction is accelerating, with grave impacts on people around the world, according to a new report.

A new report explains how humans are destroying the ecosystems that support their societies

The research conducted by Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), found out that 41% of the world's insect populations are declining while a third are endangered.

The covered the past five decades and was compiled b 145 experts authors from 50 countries and 310 contributing authors, providing a comprehensive picture of the relationship between economic development pathways and their impacts on nature.

The report also states that the extinction rate of insects is eight times faster than mammals, birds and reptiles and there are suggestions that they could totally vanish within a century.

This means that the impact of fewer insects globally will have a devastating effect on birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish that rely on them for food starving to death. According to IPBES, the end result of such devastating effect will be on the survival of mankind.

Here are other highlights of the report:

  • The Report finds that around 1 million animal and plant species are now threatened with extinction, many within decades, more than ever before in human history.
  • Three-quarters of the land-based environment and about 66% of the marine environment have been significantly altered by human actions. On average these trends have been less severe or avoided in areas held or managed by Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities.
  • More than a third of the world’s land surface and nearly 75% of freshwater resources are now devoted to crop or livestock production.
  • Plastic pollution has increased tenfold since 1980, 300-400 million tons of heavy metals, solvents, toxic sludge and other wastes from industrial facilities are dumped annually into the world’s waters, and fertilizers entering coastal ecosystems have produced more than 400 ocean ‘dead zones’, totalling more than 245,000 km2 (591-595) - a combined area greater than that of the United Kingdom.

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