According to him, the issue was fixed with an industry groundbreaking innovation, placing it in a safe location after the damaged bearing was replaced.

Mr Bruce Tait said this during an interaction with journalists on a trip to Kwame Nkrumah as part a three-part Tullow Ghana funded training program in the fundamentals of oil and gas for the media.

"The challenges with the turret have been completely resolved," he said.

He that the FPSO Kwame Nkrumah currently produces 96,200 barrels of oil a day after the challenged was fixed.

Mr Tait explained that production at the Jubilee Field was a mix of complicated systems, touting Tullow’s technical expertise to produce and safely offload oil.

“Our ability to run these processes seamlessly, with focus on safety attests to Tullow’s operational excellence. This is something to be proud of.”

Together with all other vessels in the field, the Jubilee operations have over 1000 personnel in the field with a significant proportion being Ghanaians. This Tait said means “this operation contributes significantly to local content," he added.

Turret damage

The FPSO Kwame Nkrumah, the floating production storage and offloading vessel, uses one of the biggest turrets ever constructed in the oil industry.

In 2016, lead operator of the Jubilee Field, Tullow Oil confirmed damage to the bearing which could no longer rotate as originally designed. Oil production and gas export continued but under revised operating and off-take procedures.

The Turret Remediation Project was to replace the bearing and ensure a safe and sustainable long-term offloading capability from the Jubilee field.