Kenya's tourism revenue hit Sh146 billion in 2021

Majority of visitors came from Uganda, UK and USA

TOPSHOT - Men of the Samburu tribe perform during the 11th Marsabit Lake Turkana Culture Festival in Loiyangalani near Lake Turkana, northern Kenya, on June 28, 2018. - The annual 3-day festival featurs the cultural traditions of 14 ethnic tribes in Marsabit county to promote tourism and build better relationship between tribes. (Photo by Yasuyoshi CHIBA / AFP via Getty Images)

Kenya's tourism revenues saw an increase of about Sh58 million in December 2021, compared with the same period in 2020, to reach Sh146 billion.

According to the Cabinet Secretary for Tourism, Najib Balala, this hike was due to an increase in the number of tourists in 2021 by about 302,617 to reach a total of 870,465 tourists.

The sector earned Sh88.6 billion in 2020, when travel restrictions to curb the spread of Covid-19 hit the tourism industry.

The 2022 forecast is higher than the earnings seen in 2019, before the coronavirus pandemic, when the figure stood at Sh164 billion.

Arrivals by source regions

In Africa, tourism revenues from Ugandan nationals accounted for 25 per cent of the total income, followed by visitors from Tanzania contributing 23 per cent, and then visitors from Somalia whose contributions amounted to 26 per cent.

In Europe, tourism revenues from United Kingdom accounted for 32 per cent of the total income, followed by visitors from Germany contributing 17 per cent, and then tourists from France whose contributions amounted to 11 per cent.

In Americas, tourism revenues from United States of America accounted for 88 per cent of the total income, followed by visitors from Canada contributing 9 per cent, and then tourists from Mexico, Brazil and Columbia whose contributions amounted to three per cent.

In Middle East, tourism revenues from Israel accounted for 26 per cent of the total income, followed by visitors from Iran contributing 18 per cent, and then tourists from Saudia Arabia whose contributions amounted to 15 per cent.

In Oceania, tourism revenues from Australia accounted for 80 per cent of the total income, followed by visitors from New Zealand contributing 15 per cent, and then tourists from Fiji, Nauru, Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu whose contributions amounted to five per cent.

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