We do not want to see any violence

We know the consequences of what happened in 2008 and we don't want to see a repeat of that anymore.

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Kenya's Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) have a week to declare final results but it appears incumbent President Uhuru Kenyatta, who leads the Jubilee Alliance, is on track for an outright win, which requires one vote more than 50%.

"The process is still underway. But we believe that the election's commission in Kenya has put together a process that will allow each and every vote's integrity to be proven," Kerry told CNN, noting that there were "little aberrations here and there."

In his exclusive interview broadcast on CNN International’s Amanpour program on Thursday, Odinga tells Ward he believes the IEBC is “not being truthful to the people of Kenya.”

When asked whether he feels responsibility to keep his supporters calm, Odinga says he doesn’t want to see a repeat of what happened following the December 2007 election.

“We do not want to see any violence in Kenya.  We know the consequences of what happened in 2008 and we don't want to see a repeat of that anymore. I don’t control anybody. We also hope that the security forces are not going to use excessive force.”

Here is the full interview courtesy of CNN

CLARISSA WARD, CNN CORRESPONDENT:  Mr. Odinga, thank you so much for joining us on the program.  I wanted to start out by asking you about these claims that you have made, that the election systems have been hacked. What evidence do you have of this?

RAILA ODINGA, KENYAN PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE:  Well, I did produce evidence coming from a printout from the server of the IEBC.  It showed clearly to what time the hacking was done and how long the duration of it and what kind of information, who were the people who -- or the kind of codes they were using. So this is a very authentic information that is obtained from the (INAUDIBLE) within the IEBC.

WARD:  And yet the IEBC is saying that there was attempted hack but that the attempt was not successful.

ODINGA:  Yes, which I think they're being very economical with the truth because as you know it produced 52 pages of documents detailing out what kind of information these people were able to get and what they were able to input. I think that IEBC is not being truthful to the people of Kenya.

WARD:  Well, we've also spoken to secretary of state -- former secretary of state John Kerry, who said that he, along with other international observers who were there to monitor the election, did not see any instances of what looked like voter fraud or anything like that taking place.

ODINGA:  Well, you see, the observers, as usual, they are more concerned with the cosmetic aspects of the electoral process.  They basically talk about at what time were the polling stations opened or the turnout, how are the process, the voting process itself, the counting at the polling stations.  All that, of course, you see, went very smoothly.

Now but the devil is in the details.  We're basically talking about the transmission of the results and the final tallying.  So I don’t -- I that that these observers are completely missing the point about the kind of aspect of rigging that we're talking about.

WARD:  But there is, of course, the point that the electronic ballots are backed up by paper ballots.  There is a way to count all the individual paper ballots. Does that give you some comfort?  Do you believe that when the paper ballots are individually counted that you will be announced as the winner of this election?

ODINGA:  See, what is happening is that the counting at the polling stations went very smoothly.  Where we have a problem is in the transmission of those results.  So there is a complete total mess and confusion because they're not following the procedure and this is in fact is what should have concerned the observers.  I think that the observers have not (INAUDIBLE) resolve this dispute.  They have confounded it by giving basically an approval to a fairly broad process and I'm therefore very disappointed that John Kerry and the other observers.

WARD:  Well, we have seen violence in your country at election times before, most notably in 2007; more than 1,000 people were killed.  Just yesterday protests erupted.  Two people killed. Are you concerned that there could be more violence? And do you feel some degree of responsibility now for keeping your supporters calm?

ODINGA:  As you remember yesterday, we did call supporters to remain calm as we tried to find a solution to this matter.  We do not want to see any violence in Kenya.  We know the consequences, what happened in 2008.  And we don't want to see a repeat of that anymore.

WARD:  And what will you do to ensure that there isn't a repeat of it?

(CROSSTALK)

ODINGA:  -- I don’t control anybody.  I mean, what is happening, people are clearly just want to see justice.  And we also hope that the security forces are not going to use excessive force that will translate to loss of lives of innocent people like happened yesterday.

I think regularly protests or peaceful demonstrations are allowed in any democracy and Kenya is not an exception.

CLARISSA WARD, CNN CORRESPONDENT:  Secretary Kerry, thank you so much for joining us on the program.  I want to start out by asking you about Odinga’s comments that the results of the election are fake and factitious, about these allegations that certain voting machines were defunct. How do you respond to that? What have you observed?

JOHN KERRY, FORMER US SECRETARY OF STATE:  Well, we observed an election process, more than 400 observers from nine different international missions.  All agreed that the basic process of carrying out the election was quite positive.

There were little aberrations here and there but at this point in time I want to be mindful, the election is still going on, they're still counting.  The process is still underway.

But we believe that the elections commission in Kenya has put together a process that will allow each and every vote's integrity to be proven and to be protected.  We think that the open process we witnessed, where every party agent was present, where they all agreed on what a disqualified ballot was, what a qualified ballot was, they were present when the ballots were open, present when they were closed.  They even were asked, do you agree with the final tally?

And after there was all agreement, the tally was sent in on what is called this 34-A document.  So there is a way to go back if anything was changed, if anything was electronically fiddled with.

There is a way to go back and absolutely ascertain what happened in the polling station.  So by paper ballots, there is a protection of each and every Kenyan's vote and I think it is important to let the process work through so that the election commission has a chance to show Kenyans the way in which they have held to the rules and, in fact, implemented an election that is accountable.

WARD:  So given what you observed and what you've  just said,  what do make then of Mr. Odinga's comments?

KERRY:  Well, I'm not going to characterize any candidate's comments at this point in time.  You know, he is a candidate for president of Kenya.  He has a right to question certain things.  But I also think he obviously has a responsibility to Kenya, to the democratic process, to the rule of law, to make certain that he is providing the evidence and going through a legitimate judicial process that is there for examining any kind of concerns that anybody has.

Every observer group is asking for all of the leaders to be responsible, to allow the process to work out and to put to test the system that has been put in place, where, transparently and accountably, to everybody in the full light of day, people will be able to see what happened on a particular ballot in a particular balloting location and examine whether or not the process was properly followed.

WARD:  We are hearing of some protests yesterday two; people have been killed so far. Are you concerned about this violence?

KERRY:  Well, all violence is unacceptable and, of course, anybody is concerned, anybody in their right mind is concerned about the potential of violence getting in the way of the legitimacy of this process.

This is not an electronic vote, ultimately; it's a paper ballot vote.  And so it is determinable as to what happened.  And I think it is important for all of the candidates to allow the process to be transparently put to the test and then, if they have a concern, go through the rule of law.  Go to the court process and let the evidence be there for everybody to see.

I think there is great legitimacy in the basic process.  The question now that has to be tested is, did everybody follow it? And has it, in fact, has somebody attempted to alter it at any stage?  But the important thing for people to know, for every Kenyan to know, this is their election.  It's their individual votes that they waited in line for hours to cast.  And we believe, The Carter Center believes and the other observers believe, that we can determine whether or not those votes were properly cast, properly counted, properly transmitted and whether or not the integrity of this election has been protected. And that is what is critical to every Kenyan and everybody who cares about democracy.

WARD:  And just finally, Secretary Kerry, I would be remiss if I didn't take this opportunity to just ask you quickly about your thoughts on the escalating tensions in the Korean Peninsula.

Are you concerned about what you see taking place there? And what was your response at all to President Trump's promises of fire and fury to the North Koreans if these threats continue?

KERRY:  Well, I think that terminology is concerning because it kind of pushes people into corners, into boxes.  And while it may be a legitimate point of view or an impression someone has, it is important for diplomacy to work this.

It is important for us to leave the opportunities for diplomacy to work and not to heighten tensions but rather to try to work our way through them.

So it's my hope that level heads will prevail here.  Clearly, the Chinese play a very critical role in this and we have to work very, very hard on a number of different fronts, not just the Chinese, in order to reduce the tension.

I think we have a number of options available to us -- I'm not go into them -- that do not require leaping to the full measure of the some of the rhetorical confrontation was seen today.  And I hope that people will work the diplomatic route and do what is wise.

I think wisdom is called for here in an effort to try to work through this.  It's not easy.  We worked this very hard.  We had two different initiatives at the United Nations that raised the sanctions level that this administration has appropriately pushed even further in that and I support that.

But I think you have to give a number of things time to work.  And that's the advice that I would give this at point in time.

WARD:  Very much appreciate your time.  Thank you so much for being on the program, Secretary Kerry.

KERRY:  Thank you.  Appreciate it.  Thank you very much.

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