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Inspiring story of female student who works as a security guard at night

Mary understands that whereas every job is dignified, she won’t be a guard or mama fua forever but for now, she must do what she must to make it through university even if it is at the expense of her social life.

Inspiring story of Mary Kariuki a student who works as a security guard at night

A final year student from Murang’a University has demonstrated the value of determination, planning and humility by working odd jobs to secure her future.

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Mary Kariuki, who comes from a family of eight, is a criminology student by day and a security guard at the Muranga Referral Hospital by night.

In a recent interview, she said that her friend at school did not approve of her joining a security firm as a watchman, nor did they fancy her washing clothes and other cleaning jobs.

She began her side-hustles by selling cosmetics to students but after the pandemic, she decided to look for work in a security firm.

When schools were reopened, Mary asked her employer to allow her to work night shifts so that she could attend her classes during the day.

When I don’t have classes during the day I do laundry for clients for Sh300. When I don’t have laundry to wash I clean apartment buildings for the same amount of money.

It’s not easy because sometimes if I’m cleaning a plot or washing laundry, for university students they ask me why I’m doing odd jobs.

Mary understands that whereas every job is dignified, she won’t be a guard or mama fua forever but for now, she must do what she must to make it through university even if it is at the expense of her social life.

After graduating this year, she plans on joining the security agencies as an investigator either in the government or private sector.

Her biggest challenge so far is managing her time and this means that at night while keeping an eye out for danger as a security guard, she also has to read school notes from her phone.

During the day the criminology student sleeps for about three hours before going out to wash clothes and clean apartments.

I don’t have a social life because my schedule is quite tight. I juggle between class, work and side-hustles so I basically don't have a social life,” she said.

You don't have to entirely depend on your parents, you can do odd jobs but so long as you're earning genuinely, I’d advise that you go for it instead of depending on other sources that might end up hurting or destroying your life,” Mary told her fellow young people.

Two of her other siblings are also in tertiary institutions and two others in high school so depending on her parents is not a luxury she can afford given the hard economic times.

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