All the qualifications and work experience you possess may not be of much help if you do not have a good resume. A good resume, in this case, doesn’t have to be 10 pages but a brief, relevant and one that convinces the employer to hire you.

You probably know that a good resume should not be more than three pages. So, what do you do about all the other skills you want your prospective employer to know about? Easy peasy, scrape them off. If you have the below details in your resume, it’s about time you remove them. With that, you will be left with a brief CV that is easier to scan through and not pages that no one has time to peruse and read through.

1. Personal information

Marital status on resume(CV Plaza)
Marital status on resume(CV Plaza)

Some years back, personal details were the standard way of writing a CV. But you do not have to include your age, marital status or religious background in your resume. It’s not only unnecessary but could also get you discriminated.

2. Irrelevant experience

Bartender(Gumtree)
Bartender(Gumtree)

There is no need listing all the places you worked at unless it’s related to the position you are applying for. It makes no sense to list that you worked as a bartender after high school while applying for a nursing job vacancy.

3. Unprofessional email address

If you do not have one, get one ASAP. If you have an email address like Coolboy@gmail.com, no one will take you seriously. At least show some degree of professionalism.

4. Cliché phrases

Editing CV(TopResume)
Editing CV(TopResume)

So you are “self-driven”, “goal-oriented”, and a “go-getter”. Good for you but sadly, this is what every Tom and Dick is. What sets you apart from the rest? Be creative with words and don’t describe yourself with the so obvious phrases.

5. Lies

Don’t include a skill you do not have on your CV. You might be asked to showcase your skill during the interview and you will be embarrassed if it’s something you can’t do.

6. Your time off

travelling out for the first time blavity
travelling out for the first time blavity

Whether you took a break from work to travel, take care of a sick relative or raise your children, don’t include it in your resume. If the employer notices a gap, let them ask during the interview. This is the sort of fluff that’s taking up your space.

7. Skip the buzzwords

Your resume should be very simple and clear. The jargon you think is making you seem smarter is only likely to turn off the reader. Big words tend to shift someone’s focus from the relevant details and may thus miss noting other key skills that you possess.