How do you split bills in your relationship? Do you bring everything to the table and budget for what you have or does the man always pay for everything?

Traditionally, men used to be the sole providers but things have since changed. We see some women who are the breadwinners in relationships where the man has no source of income. But let’s get it clear once and for all. Who should pay for what bills in a relationship? You see, the money talk can be really difficult to have but nevertheless, it’s a talk that every couple should have.

Money gif (Tagg Magazine)
Money gif (Tagg Magazine)

Have the money talk with your partner

We talked to relationship therapist Grace Kariuki about the issue and she was fast to note that finances can seriously affect a relationship. Grace insists that a couple must sit and agree on how they are going to spend the money they have. Even if only one partner is the breadwinner, she insists on the need to budget and plan as a couple.

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“It is important for couples to identify each other's strengths when it comes to money. One may be a better manager than the other and they can decide to allow them to do the actual disbursing of the funds with accountability and openness. For instance, one may be good at paying bills on time and it would benefit the couple to allow for that person to manage bill payments.” Grace advises.

Splitting bills in a relationship

When it comes to splitting of responsibilities, she tells Pulselive that couples should ensure there’s equity. This will ensure that the burden does not fall on one party while the other is using their money extravagantly for their own good.

Budget gif(Giphy)
Budget gif(Giphy)

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“Couples must work on an agreed plan and consistently evaluate as the family transitions from one stage to another. For instance, when the baby comes the budget must be reworked on to accommodate the new addition to the family expenses”, she goes on to say.

When only one person has an income, she insists that the two must agree on who disburses the funds. Of course, this only works well when “openness and accountability are the foundation of their financial intimacy”.