Twitter founder speaks after deal to sell platform to world's wealthiest man

Dorsey said Elon Musk aims at creating a platform that is trusted and inclusive

Jack Patrick Dorsey, the co-founder and former CEO of Twitter, is one of Yellow Card’s funders.

Twitter founder Jack Dorsey has spoken hours after arriving at a deal to sell the social media platform to the wealthiest man in the world, Elon Musk, for $44 billion.

Speaking about Musk's motivations, Dorsey conveyed that his goal is to create a platform that is trusted and inclusive. He noted that he chose Parag Agrawal as the Twitter Chief Executive because he shares the same vision as Musk.

“Elon’s goal of creating a platform that is “maximally trusted and broadly inclusive” is the right one. This is also Parag Agrawal's goal, and why I chose him.

"Thank you both for getting the company out of an impossible situation. This is the right path...I believe it with all my heart,” Dorsey wrote.

Dorsey added that he was excited that Twitter will continue serving public conversations in the world and beyond.

“I’m so happy Twitter will continue to serve the public conversation. Around the world, and into the stars!” he remarked.

On April 4, 2022 Elon Musk revealed that he had purchased a sizable stake in Twitter. Three weeks later, Musk and Twitter have closed a deal for the billionaire to acquire the social media company entirely and take it private.

Over the few months, Musk has given more hints about what he would change about Twitter — in interviews, regulatory filings and, of course, on his personal Twitter account.

Here are the main areas Mr. Musk could seek to address:

The billionaire has frequently expressed concern that Twitter’s content moderators go too far in intervening, moderating, on the platform, as he views it as the internet’s “de facto town square.”

In the regulatory filing in which he announced his bid to buy Twitter, he wrote: “I invested in Twitter as I believe in its potential to be the platform for free speech around the globe, and I believe free speech is a societal imperative for a functioning democracy.”

He added that he didn’t trust the company’s current leadership to make the changes he saw as necessary and prioritize his ideas about free speech on the platform. Since making my investment, I now realize the company will neither thrive nor serve this societal imperative in its current form,” he wrote. “Twitter needs to be transformed as a private company.”

The question is, does the world need any more liberties if it has not harnessed ethically exploiting the current liberties?

Mr. Musk has also pointed to the politicization of the platform before, and recently tweeted that any social media platform’s policies “are good if the most extreme 10 percent on left and right are equally unhappy.”

At a TED conference earlier this month, Musk elaborated on his plans to make the company’s algorithm an open-source model, which would allow users to see the code showing how certain posts came up in their timelines.

Social media users have complained that algorithms control their lives, enticing them to spend more time on Twitter, Facebook, and other platforms. Some Twitter users prefer to see tweets in chronological order.

Musk said the open-source method would be better than “having tweets sort of being mysteriously promoted and demoted with no insight into what’s going on.”

Musk engaged Twitter users in making this decision when he created a poll, with the majority opting for the open-source algorithm.

Twitter users have long asked for a way to edit their tweets for typos and other problems, but the highly requested feature hasn't been at the top of the company's priorities. Twitter did include a way to undo tweets as part of its Twitter Blue $3-a-month subscription plan.

On April 5, 2022, Musk brought up the idea of an edit button again, tweeting another poll. "Do you want an edit button," he tweeted, misspelling the words yes and no. More than 4 million votes were cast, with almost three-quarters supporting the idea.

An edit button would mean history can be altered, words can be changed, and errors can be corrected. The debate on this is the possible death of the integrity of words over liberties to speech.

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