Hey, shout outs to all the village girls and boys who have since become great men and women of this nation.

You see, growing up in the village was not some piece of cake. No, it wasn’t actually as bad as I have just tried to make it appear. Anyways, it had its fair share of great and incredible moments.

Let’s just have a recount of some of those sweet, sour and bitter moments that marked our childhood days in the village.

1. Perfect baths

Bathroom moments were my best. Water was filled in a metallic basin, left in the sun to get warm before proceeding for an afternoon bath session. Here, you would scrub your body with a piece of sack then use a pumice stone to clean your feet. There was no excuse for cracked heels.

2. Laundry at the river

There was always a river or dam nearby where you would go every Saturday to clean all the dirty clothes. Usually, you would wash them in a basin and rinse them in the flowing water. The clothes would then be spread on tree branches to dry.

3. Going to school barefooted

This was no big deal by the way. Even if you had shoes, you would rather have left them at home than become the laughing stock of the day. The morning dew and the rough stones on the way had no mercy though.

4. Wild fruits

Heavens! We ate all sort of wild fruits and never fell ill. You would even run away from school to go and gather wild fruits and somehow the teachers never noticed. Or maybe they didn’t care as much.

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5. Herding

This was fun until you let the animals feast on your neighbor’s maize. This was the perfect moment to climb trees, hunt for hares and gather fruits. Afternoons were swimming sessions at the river or dam after ensuring that the animals drank water. The climax would be a thorough and merciless beating in the evening because the parents would always know that you swam again even despite several warnings.

6. The koroboi

This little piece of lamp was bad news but it helped a great deal. It was mostly used in the kitchen while the ordinary kerosene lamp was preserved for sitting room uses. The koroboi would sometimes decide to go off and you had to eat in darkness or go to bed immediately.